Glossary

A key aspect to building bridges between different disciplines is a common understanding of language. Sometimes a new word is required to describe new connections. This glossary includes/will include words compiled by students in the Fall 2017 class as part of an exercise in comparing definitions of key terminology in heritage conservation and sustainability.  The words may come from existing glossaries, encyclopedias, textbooks, policy documents, or scholarly work that includes definitions as part of positioning their research. The meanings of words change over time, and in different contexts of use, so this glossary should be seen as a starting point rather than a definitive source.

Adaptive reuse

Authenticity

Bio-climatic architecture

Bio-diversity

Brownfield regeneration

Built environment

“The term ‘built environment’ encompasses all of the physical structures and elements of the human made environments in which we live, work, travel and play.”

Frank L, Engelke P.  (2005) “Multiple Impacts of the Built Environment on Public Health: Walkable Places and the Exposure to Air Pollution.” International Regional Science Review 2:193-216.

Carbon neutrality

Climate change

Contaminated land

Cultural ecology

“The study of the relations between humans and their environment, paying particular attention to processes of adaptation through cultural means. […] Cultural ecology combines anthropologists’ interest in the ethnographic study of non-industrial societies with an understanding of key ecological concepts such as resilience, stability, and biodiversity.”

Castree, N., Kitchin R. & Rogers A. (2013). A Dictionary of Human Geography. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Cultural Heritage

“For the purposes of this Convention, the following shall be considered as “cultural heritage”:

    • architectural works, works of monumental sculpture and painting, elements or structures of an archaeological nature, inscriptions, cave dwellings and combinations of features, which are of outstanding universal value from the point of view of history, art or science;
    • groups of buildings:groups of separate or connected buildings which, because of their architecture, their homogeneity or their place in the landscape, are of outstanding universal value from the point of view of history, art or science;
    • sites:works of man or the combined works of nature and man, and areas including archaeological sites which are of outstanding universal value from the historical, aesthetic, ethnological or anthropological point of view.

United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO]. (1972). Convention Concerning the Protection of Natural and Cultural Heritage.

Cultural landscape

Cultural sustainability

Cultural tourism

Dissonant heritage

Durability

Ecological integrity

Economic sustainability

Embodied Energy

Environmental mitigation

Environmental sustainability

Heritage conservation

Heritage value

The aesthetic, historic, scientific, cultural, social or spiritual importance or significance for past, present or future generations. The heritage value of a historic place is embodied in its character-defining materials, forms, location, spatial configurations, uses and cultural associations or meanings.

Parks Canada. (2010) The Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada.

Historic place

“A structure, building, group of buildings, district, landscape, archaeological site or other place in Canada that has been formally recognized for its heritage value by an appropriate authority within a jurisdiction.”

Parks Canada. (2010) The Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada.

Historic urban landscape

“the urban area understood as the result of a historic layering of cultural and natural values and attributes, extending beyond the notion of “historic centre” or “ensemble” to include the broader urban concept and its geographical setting….”

UNESCO. (2011). “Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape.” UNESCO General Conference 36C, Annex, 5-12.

Indigenous ecological knowledge

Integrated design process

Lifecycle analysis

Minimal intervention

National historic site

National park

NATURAL Heritage

“For the purposes of this Convention, the following shall be considered as “natural heritage”:

  • natural features: consisting of physical and biological formations or groups of such formations, which are of outstanding universal value from the aesthetic or scientific point of view;
  • geological and physiographical formations and precisely delineated areas which constitute the habitat of threatened species of animals and plants of outstanding universal value from the point of view of science or conservation;
  • natural sites or precisely delineated natural areas of outstanding universal value from the point of view of science, conservation or natural beauty.”

United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO]. (1972). Convention Concerning the Protection of Natural and Cultural Heritage.

Nature conservation

Permaculture

Posterity recording

Resilience

Reversibility

Smart growth

Social sustainability

Stewardship

Traditional land use

Urban conservation

Urban density

Urban ecosystem

Values-based conservation

Vernacular architecture

Voluntary simplicity

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